Leading Lines: Project 52

One of the tenets of photography that can make a photograph compelling is leading lines… moving the viewer’s eyes toward the subject so as to spotlight the subject.  Leading lines can be anything… train tracks, an architectural design, buildings, roads, trees, or, a pier on a body of water.  This first photo has no pets, but it’s a great example of leading lines.  I attended a polo match that was raising money for the shelter where my camera volunteers, and took this photo of the entrance.  Believe it or not, this is private property, and it’s only the entrance!

The next photo is of Buddy, a recent client whose companions live on the Gulf of Mexico.  It was a beautiful day – one of so few these past several months – so putting him near or on the pier seemed natural.  I really wanted to place him in the center of the pier, but his owners said he didn’t like to go on the pier.  While the lines may not be “leading” by the strict definition, they do help to spotlight the dog. 

Let’s keep the loop going!  Go over to Linda of VPShoots Photography serving the Tampa Bay, Florida area and see her leading lines photos.

Project 52: Frames

This week’s theme is “Framed”.  By definition, “framing is the technique of drawing attention to the subject of your image by blocking other parts of the image with something in the scene.”  I was photographying this gorgeous Great Dane, Reagan, at her parents’ home.  They had a lot of pine trees around the house and I saw these two close enough together to think they could frame this beauty.  The client loved it! 

Check out Elaine at I Got The Shot Photography, serving Northeastern Pennsylvania and surrounding areas to see her framed photo.

Project 52: Low Key

This week’s theme is Low Key.  Of my five animals, my black cat, Momi (mo-me.. means “pearl” in Hawaiian) is my most cooperative model.  She will stand where I place her while I attempt to get the shot.  This time, because she was black, I wanted to capture her black on black.  I placed a piece of black seamless paper on one of my walls, turned off the lights, and placed my TD6 light stand to the left of the set-up.  I turned off 5 of the lights, and placed the softbox so that the light kind of skimmed in front of her, not aimed directly on her.  Below are two results of that session.

Low Key can be so dramatic.  Head on over to Elaine at I Got The Shot Photography, Northeastern PA Pet Photographer to see how she interpreted the theme this week.