Leading Lines: Project 52

One of the tenets of photography that can make a photograph compelling is leading lines… moving the viewer’s eyes toward the subject so as to spotlight the subject.  Leading lines can be anything… train tracks, an architectural design, buildings, roads, trees, or, a pier on a body of water.  This first photo has no pets, but it’s a great example of leading lines.  I attended a polo match that was raising money for the shelter where my camera volunteers, and took this photo of the entrance.  Believe it or not, this is private property, and it’s only the entrance!

The next photo is of Buddy, a recent client whose companions live on the Gulf of Mexico.  It was a beautiful day – one of so few these past several months – so putting him near or on the pier seemed natural.  I really wanted to place him in the center of the pier, but his owners said he didn’t like to go on the pier.  While the lines may not be “leading” by the strict definition, they do help to spotlight the dog. 

Let’s keep the loop going!  Go over to Linda of VPShoots Photography serving the Tampa Bay, Florida area and see her leading lines photos.

Project 52: Frames

This week’s theme is “Framed”.  By definition, “framing is the technique of drawing attention to the subject of your image by blocking other parts of the image with something in the scene.”  I was photographying this gorgeous Great Dane, Reagan, at her parents’ home.  They had a lot of pine trees around the house and I saw these two close enough together to think they could frame this beauty.  The client loved it! 

Check out Elaine at I Got The Shot Photography, serving Northeastern Pennsylvania and surrounding areas to see her framed photo.

Project 52: Low Key

This week’s theme is Low Key.  Of my five animals, my black cat, Momi (mo-me.. means “pearl” in Hawaiian) is my most cooperative model.  She will stand where I place her while I attempt to get the shot.  This time, because she was black, I wanted to capture her black on black.  I placed a piece of black seamless paper on one of my walls, turned off the lights, and placed my TD6 light stand to the left of the set-up.  I turned off 5 of the lights, and placed the softbox so that the light kind of skimmed in front of her, not aimed directly on her.  Below are two results of that session.

Low Key can be so dramatic.  Head on over to Elaine at I Got The Shot Photography, Northeastern PA Pet Photographer to see how she interpreted the theme this week.

Project 52: Green

I love green.  It’s my favorite color.  I painted my kitchen green, even repainted the cabinets medium olive green (believe me, it’s all light and lovely, not overpowering) when I renovated three years ago, as well as installed granite counter tops with specks of green.  So, when I saw that the theme this week was green, I knew exactly what picture to share with you.

A while back, I took my dog Chloe to our front lawn as the sun was setting, tied her to a tree and started snapping.  She looked at me and I kept snapping.  When I got back to my computer and saw these, I loved them.  Now, green can be too much, I realize that.  Some may not like this, but I do.  My camera was at 200mm and pretty wide open at f3.2, causing the grass to blur very nicely.  The only problem was that there wasn’t enough light to lighten her face, so I used the adjustment brush in LR and also intensified her catchlights, which can be a challenge with her.  I think the way her eyes are made, catchlights can be difficult.  I also used the adjustment brush to remove a slight green caste she got on her face.

Check out Pet Love Photography, serving Greater Cincinnati and the San Francisco Bay Area to see her green interpretation.

Project 52: High Key

I learned about high-key lighting when I took a workshop from a professional pet photographer.  I do not yet have the lights that are normally used – flash strobes, etc.  I presently use either natural light or continuous lights. At the shelter where I volunteer to take photos, I use the continuous lights and it can be hard to get a white background to appear white, but, below, is pretty darn near close to it.   And I think pretty close to high key.   This is Bishop and I took his photo several weeks ago and love how it came out.

With all the snow some folks have been having (we didn’t get any here in Alabama), there should be some out there with high key lighting because of the snow.  Click on to Pet Love Photography, serving Greater Cincinnati and the San Francisco Bay Area to see if, perhaps, they did.

Project 52: Love

Love is in the air.

Personally, I  see love when I look into the eyes of my pets.  One in particular is my Chloe.  She’s my velcro dog, she follows me around the house, but, one thing she doesn’t really like, is for me to kiss her.  So, I got a little playful last night and inserted a red lips overlay on her in this photo showing her gazing up at me, as she always does.  Sorry Chloe!

Now, moving on to the actual photo representing love.  I very seldom include people in my photos, but rather want to concentrate on the pet.  But, the end of last year, in another Christmas card session, I took this photo below.  The owner had wanted a silhouette type of picture.  The sun was setting from the left and between the pier we were on and the sun were trees, boat houses, boats… not really conducive to a clean silhouette.  So I told the owner that we would take a semi-silhouette photo.  This is my personal favorite of the session since you can see the dog gazing into her owner’s eyes.  Shows the wonderful bond between us and our pets.

To continue the circle, go to Pet Love Photography, serving Greater Cincinnati and the San Francisco Bay Area to see their interpretation of “LOVE”.

Project 52: Before and After

Several years ago when I started taking my photography seriously, I swore I would never use post-processing and always get it right in camera!!!  Right!  How naive!  It is something I still strive to achieve, but, of course, post-processing is a must!  Presently, I go between Lightroom and Photoshop to post-process.  Most is done in Lightroom, but I’m starting to use PS to remove leashes, blemishes, distracting background, etc.  I took an on-line course last year on PS Layers and do understand them a little better, although I should use them more often.

This past Christmas, I had a client who wanted to photograph her two white dogs for a Christmas card.  She owns a beauty salon and that’s where we took the photos.  She covered her small vintage-type couch with a white sheet, brought in some artificial greenery and holly, as well as a “Merry Christmas” sign.  She even put the decorative bows on her dog.  I picked one photo for the card and, below, is how it looked straight out of camera.  The client wanted a winter-type scene.  Well, we live in Alabama and a white winter doesn’t happen.  I found a product called “Twinkle Blanket” (similar to fiberfill) from Hobby Lobby and fluffed it on the couch.  We then placed the dogs on the couch.  Well, one starting to eat the “snow”, roll around, and, well, just be a dog.  So, as you can see, there’s very little “snow” left.  But I liked their expressions, they were close together (as opposed to on either side of the couch), and they were looking up at the owner.  But I had to do a lot of work.

In PS, I cloned a lot of the “snow”, smoothed out the wrinkles, and cleaned up the dogs, using Spot Healing Brush, Patch Tool, Clone Tool, etc.  The dog on the left, Ruby, only has one eye.  But in this photo, that one eye was covered by her hair.  So I copied a more visible eye from another photo and placed it over the covered eye in this one.  Also, the dog laying down, Moonlight, had a bow that was hidden by the “snow”.  I did the same thing and copied a more complete looking bow and inserted it in the photo.  The result is below.

The photo below is a scan of the card.  (NOTE:  Just in case you wondered, I did not have the watermark on the card)  Perhaps to some in this group this is no biggy and I’m sure you might see where I could have done it differently or better.  But to me it was a huge accomplishment, and the client was happy.

Click over to Linda of DogShotz Photography serving the Indianapolis IN area to see their take on this weeks’ theme.

Project 52: Different Perspective

The topic this week is  “Different Perspective.”  As a photographer, we try to get the best composition before we snap the shutter.  Often, we get frustrated because it just doesn’t seem to be the right one.  Many times, just composing the photo from a different angle,  or the photographer physically moving a few inches either way can make a great difference.  I took an e-photography course last year and the instructor told us to, occasionally, look down.  For that class, I got on a very high ladder and snapped the foliage in my backyard.  Let me add, that I very seldom do this and it tells me that I should do it more often in my sessions.

For this week’s theme, I just stood on a chair and hovered over one of my cats, Misty, as she was sleeping on the bed.  I got her to look up and the result is more interesting than if I had just put the camera on the bed in line with her face.

Head on over to Dog Shotz Photography serving the Indianapolis IN area to see their interpretation of this week’s theme.

 

Project 52: Negative Space

Negative Space is the topic of the week.   Negative space can be defined  as “the empty or open space around an object that defines it.”  I don’t think my selected photos are a true example of negative space as there is something in that area, but busy week, so I grabbed this one as a possible example.

Just a few days ago, I photographed Glenn, a senior dachshund (about 17 years old).  This little guy can’t walk well and is incontinent, but he still has a lot of energy.  After trying, not too successfully, to take some photos on a bench, the owner suggested putting him on the floor.  Shortly after she did that, he looked up at her and I knew I had a good picture.  Have not yet finished the post-processing, but the direction of his eyes told me a bit of space was needed.  Below you can see the difference from the two different crops.  I favor the second one as it tells a bit of a story.  Those eyes seem to be asking: “Why am I down here?”, “What do I do now?”

Cropped close….

 

Cropped with a bit of space….

 

Head on over to Natural, Playful & Soulful Pet Photography in Melbourne, Australia to see their take on negative space.

 

 

Project 52: Black and White

This week’s theme is “Black and White.”  I think the first thought is a photo converted to black and white.  Below is one I took of my dog several months ago.  Rather moody and not really typical of what I do.

However,  I wanted to be a bit creative.  I have a black cat who is really a fabulous model.  I taped a piece of white background paper to a wall,  and then positioned a small piece of black backdrop paper in a “diamond” shape over that. NOTE: It’s not perfectly symmetrical so no need to tell me that.  I purchased a black/white throw (lots on sale now at the discount stores) and put it over a bench.  I recently acquired various colors/designs of ties that a cat or small dog could wear, so I selected a black and white tie.  I had originally wanted to photograph my black cat with my white/black cat who actually has more white than black.  However, this white/black cat is very skittish and she wouldn’t in any way sit still.  So I used only my black cat.  I placed a TD5 light stand on the side.

That’s my interpretation this time around of “Black and White”.  Click over to Bark & Gold Photography to see their interpretation.